Slowly Purging

My first big act towards a slower way of life was learning how to let go. I slowly needed to learn how to purge. I realized that to reach my maximum clarity - I needed a clear space. I'm not a minimalist. Still, I'm creating room for the movement of the Spirit and for our four souls.

Originally written on:

Thursday, Sept. 19

4:25 pm ET - 4:50 pm

My family is visiting

Neiko doing homework with Gigi (my mom)

Dad in the business center. Sister napping.

Noah softly snoring in his little bed.

Mr Steel working from home office. He's in town today :)

Sitting at the wooden kitchen table

Drinking room temperature Numi organic tea - Matcha Toasted Rice with lemonade (Arnold Palmer)

Listening to Strong Enough, Celine Cairo


Slowly letting go

Years ago, I read Maria Kondo's Tidying book. At the time, it resonated, but I was so used to living in tiny NYC, Bk, Philly, DC apartments that I didn't act on it. In fact, at the time, I was pretty convinced that I lived a pretty minimalistic lifestyle. Well, after moving eight times - seven different cities - things accumulated fast. And in GA, I'm not a hoarder, but let's just say that I have been getting rid of things regularly, and I still have plenty.



Daily Purging

I am not a minimalist, but I do believe in the power of clear space. Space where positivity can flow. I think that feelings, spirits, sadness can get lost or hide behind the stuff. I believe in sacred spaces, holy spaces, refuge spaces. I believe in following your Peace. My Peace is found in my Creator's simplicity.

I've never been good at multitasking. And although a mess doesn't bother me, chaotic spaces discombobulate me when I am trying to be productive. I like time to make decisions, to process, and when things are what they are. I'm easily lost in the grey. I will misplace the keys and create disorder without a rhythm, routine, a daily flow. In boundary-less spaces, I move too freely, and nothing gets accomplished. As a B-type personality in very A-type situations (private schools, university, work, etc.) I realized quickly that my strength would have to be in creating organized systems and structures. Well, I learned with help. As a young teen, I had a weekly meeting with an "organizational coach." Thanks, mom and dad. Everything has it's space, it's time, it's season. Keeping things tidy allows me to move freely - it's liberating for me. I can be present and clear-minded and on track within those spaces. I need our living area to reflect that. It's cozy and lived in, personality throughout it - but not too much. Again, it's not minimalistic, but it isn't saturated either. You can't be confused - you can't get lost. You feel it. You see it. You smell it. And when I say "it" - it's not material. I don't want to feel stuff - I want to feel our souls - His spirit. I want creativity, love, peace, and harmony to be felt. It's living and moving - plants, people, vegetables, cool breeze, tons of sunlight, and burning candles/incense. And so I have to consistently get rid of the things that don't bring joy. Things that don't move us. For me, this is something constant. It's not one big dump like many experts suggest. Between my sentimental nature and my two little boys, it's an ongoing project. It's a part of my daily rhythm. I move from room to room, space to space, drawer to drawer. What was relevant a month ago is no longer essential. And it's funny because as I clean daily, it starts to become rhythmic and meditative. A clean house, candles lit, and tea-timer buzzing signals that it's time for a 30-45 minute chill block for me.


I hope that you're finding joy in your daily life.


Shalom, Friends!

Shelby


P.S. Pray for me, y'all, that I get to the next level. That is actually picking up the house as I go. I still leave a "Shelby trail" all over my home. My family used to say (and Mike currently says) that I leave a trail of mess behind me as I travel from room to room.